Posted by: servicecoordination | November 3, 2014

Access by Voters with Disabilities

Maryland is committed to making voting accessible to all voters. Almost all of Maryland’s polling places are accessible to voters with disabilities on election day.

Is my polling place accessible?

Use the voter look-up website to find out if your polling place is accessible. If your polling place is not accessible, there will be a list of the reasons why. This may help you decide if the polling place is accessible for you.

Is the touchscreen voting unit accessible?

The touchscreen voting unit is accessible to most voters. Using a headset and keypad, blind voters and voters with low vision are able to vote by listening to the ballot selections and by using the keypad. You may also choose to use the high contrast and large print functions of the voting unit. The touchscreen voting unit can also be used by voters who need to sit while voting.

If you want use the audio ballot, ask an election judge. Election judges will answer questions and help you, if needed.

Can someone help me vote?

Yes. You can bring someone to help you vote as long as that person is not:

  • Your employer or an agent of your employer
  • An officer or agent of your union
  • A challenger or watcher

Or, you may choose to have two election judges help you.

The person helping you must sign the Voter Assistance Form and cannot suggest how you should vote.

For more information, visit: http://www.elections.state.md.us/voting/accessibility.html

Posted by: servicecoordination | October 27, 2014

Voting Rights In Maryland

Disability Law Center

As a Marylander Voter, you have the right to:

Vote in an accessible polling place.  Call your local board of elections or check on-line at http://www.elections.state.md.us/voting/accessibility.html to find out if your polling site is accessible to you.  The on-line polling site locator will also confirm that you are registered.  To request an accessible polling site contact your local board of elections by close of voter registration.

Vote at an early voting center in the county where you live.  To find an early voting center near you, go to:  http://www.elections.state.md.us/voting/early_voting.html

Vote by absentee ballot.  Any registered voter may request to vote by absentee ballot.  To get an application and to check deadlines, go to: http://www.elections.state.md.us/voting/absentee.html

Cast a private and independent ballot.

Receive voting assistance if needed.  You may ask an election judge for help, or bring any other person to help you except your employer or union official.

Cast a ballot on an accessible voting machine.  You may select a large print or high contrast ballot.  You may also request an audio ballot, which requires the use of headphones and a keypad.  The angle of the voting machines can also be adjusted for better access.

Cast a ballot as long as you are in line when the polls close.

Vote a provisional ballot if your name does not appear on the voter registration list or there is a question about your eligibility to vote.

It is a good idea to bring identification with youFederal law requires that if you registered to vote by mail you must provide identification before voting for the first time in Maryland.

Voter Hotline

To report voting concerns that may be related to a disability (such as access to a polling place, voter assistance, or problems using a voting machine) contact: 

Maryland Disability Law Center at 410-727-6352, ext. 2601; 800-233-7201, ext. 2601; TTY 410-235-5387

Posted by: servicecoordination | October 24, 2014

News From Service Coordination, Inc.

From the October issue of The Exchange. Read the full edition here.

Read our monthly newsletter.

Posted by: servicecoordination | October 21, 2014

CMS Community Rule (Regulation) Update:

Important Reminder: CMS Community Rule (Regulation) Update:

The Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) has developed three surveys to get input from three groups: (1) participants/caregivers, (2) case managers/support planners/resource coordinators, and (3) residential and assisted living providers. Links to each survey are below:

1) Survey for Participants or Caregivers 
*The purpose of this survey is to collect information about a participants’ plan of service and settings where they receive services.
2) Survey for Case Managers/Supports Planners
*The purpose of this survey is to collect information about participants’ service plans and the process used for writing those plans.
3) Survey for Residential Providers
*The purpose of this survey is to collect information about residential providers’ settings and services.

You may also request a paper copy of the survey by emailing dhmh.hcbssetting@maryland.gov. DHMH has requested the surveys be completed no later than Friday, October 31, 2014. If you have questions regarding the surveys, please contact MaryAnn Mood at mamood@hilltop.umbc.edu or 410-455-6395.

Additional information regarding the CMS Community Rule (Regulations) is located on the Department’s Medicaid and Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) websites as follows:

IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS REGARDING THE CMS COMMUNITY RULE (REGULATIONS), PLEASE CONTACT REJIE ABRAHAM OR MEGAN MOORE AT DHMH.HCBSSETTING@MARYLAND.GOV OR BY PHONE AT 410-767-6882.
Posted by: servicecoordination | October 15, 2014

Service Coordination Is Now Hiring

Now Hiring

Posted by: servicecoordination | October 8, 2014

White House Holds Disability Summit to Improve Health

After a finding that nearly half of disabled people are physically inactive, the issue of health and wellness for disabled people has come to the forefront of many public health organizations. This week, the White House is holding a summit to bring together advocates, experts and people with feedback from a variety of perspectives to discuss ways to get disabled people more active, and to work on getting these methods out into the U.S. public. The event markedthe first time that the White House had held a disability-focused health and fitness summit specifically looking at ways to improve health outcomes for disabled people.

Disability is often associated in the popular mind with ill health, but that doesn’t actually need to be the case. A wheelchair user, for example, can be very healthy although she may lack mobility in her legs. However, she can also experience health problems like poor core and upper body strength, pressure sores, asthma, and other issues that might be alleviated by helping her get active and connecting her with a nutritionist who can meet her specific needs. This summit focused on building a commitment to inclusion among people and organizations who work in the health care, physical fitness and nutrition fields.

It started on Monday at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building with an event that included administrative officials, parents and members of community groups. They discussed successful community initiatives that have reached disabled people and their families. On Tuesday, the event transitioned to the Department of Health and Human Services, where members of the summit discussed ways to improve and implement fitness initiatives for the nation with a specific focus on disability inclusion; one important aspect to this is educating community groups about the 9 Guidelines for Disability Inclusion developed as part of the Commitment to Inclusion initiative.

These address issues like accessibility, making disabled people stakeholders in program development, affordability and clear metrics for evaluating outcomes. While the guidelines are aimed at fitness programs, they’re more widely applicable to any setting where people want assistance with disability inclusion, whether it’s a conference, fundraising event, or community project. The guidelines reinforce the need to keep the needs of disabled people in mind at all times when developing programs, and to accommodate those with needs that are different from those of the general population.

The National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability, the American Association on Health and Disability, the Center on Disability at the Public Health Institute, and the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition (PCFSN) were among the participants at the event, which examined why disabled people have trouble accessing fitness programs, and how barriers can be overcome. Barriers to inclusion can include physical inaccessibility, instructors who aren’t trained in working with disabled people, affordability, difficulty in getting to facilities, isolation and housing difficulties.

This is a multidisciplinary issue with serious policy implications for the United States, both in terms of improving health outcomes for disabled people and including disabled people more broadly in society. Whenever the White House holds a summit on disability policy, it sends a signal to the nation that the federal government is committed to addressing disability issues, and wants to work with disability advocacy groups to achieve positive outcomes for the disability community. Groups like the National Council on Disability play a key role in making sure the U.S. policy landscape includes disabled people every step of the way.

By s.e.smith, from care2.com, October 7, 2014

See original story here.

Posted by: servicecoordination | October 7, 2014

Service Coordination Is Now Hiring

IMG_6896

Join Our Team!

Service Coordination, Inc. employs more than 280 Resource Coordinators in offices throughout areas in Southern, Central and Western Maryland; serving more than 14,000 individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities. Our staff are highly qualified; education of a Bachelor’s degree or higher is a requirement for hire. Our Resource Coordinators have on average 6 years’ working experience with us. They work hard each and every day to make a difference!

Service Coordination, Inc. is also unique due to our mobile workforce and technological capabilities which allow us to work from virtually anywhere in the communities in which we serve people. If you meet the following qualifications and are interested in being part of a dedicated team that works to improve the lives of people with disabilities, please apply today.

Qualifications

1. Bachelor’s degree or Master’s degree in a human service field.*

​2. Significant experience in working with people with developmental disabilities preferred.

3. Belief in and ability to implement the principles of self-determination for people with developmental disabilities.

4. Must be willing to assist people with developmental disabilities to develop community connections and support networks.

5. Ability to or experience in working collaboratively with different groups or service systems to identify, coordinate, and assure appropriate services.

6. Experience with person directed individual planning.

7. Must have energy, persistence, flexibility, good negotiation skills, and the ability to deal professionally and positively with difficult situations.

8. Ability to work a flexible schedule, including evenings and weekends, to meet the needs of people served.

9. Good time management and organizational skills.

10. Ability to communicate effectively both verbally and in writing.

11. Ability to prioritize work.

12. Have a reliable automobile to travel to visits, meetings, etc. and a valid driver’s license with a good driving record.

13. Be proficient in Microsoft Word and Excel; ability to learn new technology

Duties

1. Assist individuals in identifying life goals and specific preferences.

2. Assist individuals in identifying and utilizing community connections and natural support networks.

3. Educate individuals about self-determination, enviable lives, and natural supports and assist individuals in exploring the implications for themselves.

4. Recommend supports and services to help individuals achieve their goals.

5. Coordinate the Individual Plan specifying preferences and supports and services for each assigned individual.

6. Locate and coordinate services. Provide technical support and direct assistance in locating services to include resolving crises.

7. Advocate for and assist individuals in advocating on their own behalf.

8. Monitor identified supports and services to determine individual’s satisfaction with services, and quality of services, addressing concerns as necessary.

9. Work cooperatively with individuals, families, service professionals, and others to ensure that necessary supports and services are located and implemented.

10. Participate in activities that promote community awareness and acceptance of people with disabilities.

11. Recommend and engage in projects designed to empower people with disabilities or to expand or improve the service delivery system.

12. Participate in meetings and training sessions that offer learning opportunities and that promote and enhance skills and professional development.

13. Maintain accurate up-to-date files for each individual served, and maintain other files as necessary for the success of the project.

14. Complete other administrative duties as required.

15. Perform all duties as described, and others as required, using the foundation of agency philosophy and values.
For more information and to apply now, visit: https://www.servicecoord.org/careers.html

Posted by: servicecoordination | September 30, 2014

Arc Maryland Announces New Executive Director

arc

The Arc Maryland announced the appointment of their new Executive Director, Cristine Boswell Marchand. Cristy has over 30 years’ experience in disability rights and public policy at the state and local levels on behalf of children and adults with

intellectual and developmental disabilities, with over 20 years managing The Arc Maryland until her move to New Mexico in 2011.

“The Arc Maryland is a catalyst to drive creative and positive change to impact the lives of children and adults with disabilities and their families. I deeply appreciate the honor and opportunity to be part of that change and look forward to partnering with stakeholders and partners,” said Marchand.

Cristy’s passion and commitment for inclusive lives for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, family engagement in systems change, and self-advocacy leadership will be a wonderful benefit as she leads The Arc Maryland once again.

Most recently the Executive Director of Family Voices, a national organization dedicated to quality and family-centered heath care for children and youth with special health care needs and disabilities with 44 state affiliates and Family to Family
Health Information Centers in every state, Cristy will begin her duties on October 1, 2014.

For more information, visit: http://www.thearcmd.org.

From PRlog.org

Originally posted on THE INTERNET POST:

Something is very wrong here.

Shell Tzorfas on YouTube pointed us to this U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) paper “Trends in the Prevalence of Developmental Disabilities in U.S. Children, 1997–2008” and what are some pretty astonishing figures.

The joint CDC—Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) paper not only revealed that one in six children across America suffered from a developmental disability in 2006-2008, but the rate of parent-reported developmental disabilities in their children had increased 17.1% from 1997 to 2008.

Worse, in the 12-year period, the prevalence of autism increased nearly three hundred percent (289.5%).

Males were twice as likely to suffer from developmental disabilities as females. The sample size wasn’t small, either; the study included some 119,367 children.

One in six. That means if you go to just two of your neighbors’ homes with children, it is very likely that at one of them, you will…

View original 26 more words

Originally posted on BEST BUDDIES BLOG:

  • NBA Star and Best Buddies Global Sports Ambassador Kyrie Irving hosts the Best Buddies Pep Rally and Basketball Game
  • Julie Remillard wins first ever “Best Buddies Jobs Employee of the Year Award”
  • Best Buddies Ambassador and Jobs Participant Jorge Morilla wins “Spirit of Courage Award”
  • Star of the new movie “Produce” David DeSanctis attends screening of his film at the Conference
  • More than 15,000 people tuned in to watch the Conference, live streamed

Bloomington, IN (July 30, 2014) – Over 2,000 student leaders, volunteers, and staff from Best Buddies International’s programs around the world participated in the 25th Annual Best Buddies International Leadership Conference: Journey to Innovation presented by C.A. Hartnell, July 25-28 at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. The weekend offered attendees new ideas to share with their chapters’ back home, networking opportunities, and most importantly, lasting friendships.

View original 791 more words

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